View From Here - Hawaii Travel Blog

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View From Here - Hawaii Travel Blog - Whalewatching

Welcome to View from Here, a travel blog, where I write about living in, traveling about and experiencing Hawaii as a malihini, a 12-year-resident of the Hawaiian Islands. My name is Kim Steutermann Rogers, and you're likely to find blog posts here about food--who doesn't like to eat?--and outdoor adventure. Like hiking through Haleakala on Maui. Diving with manta rays off Hawaii (Big) Island. Snorkeling Shark's Cove on Oahu. And paddling Napali Coast of my home island, Kauai. Not that I'm some, young, adrenaline junkie. Those days are long over. I just enjoy collecting life experiences. And that's why you probably won't find much in the way of shopping here, unless it's about a fantastic, locally-made product--like soap--and the charming, young, single-mother who makes it. Then, I gush on and on. Oh, as a warning, I can sometimes jump on my soap box and write about the realities of marine debris, Hawaii's endangered species--like humpback whales and Hawaiian monk seals--great book discoveries and the wonders of nature. And my dogs.

Total Number of Entries - 27
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  • Jake's List: Ten Things About Humpbacks You May Not Know

    Destination: Oahu

    whale watching off diamond headDid you know the tongue of an humpback whales weighs 2,000 pounds? That’s the weight of a VW Bug. And 363,000 pennies. And, of course, a ton of bricks. The one-ton tongue of a 45-ton humpback whale works like a giant tofu press to squeeze water out of its mouth in order to eat.

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  • Show Up. Work hard. Repeat.

    Destination: Hawaii Island, Kauai, Maui, Oahu

    breaching whale off lahaina, mauiIn the photo, a humpback whale is rocketing its estimated 40-ton body out of the water. The fast shutter speed of the camera catches what must be thousands of water droplets spiraling around the whale’s enormous body—off its sun-glinting, scallop-edged pectoral fins and haloing its head. The action in this image was caught after the whale’s propulsion reached its apex, and the whale’s heavy body is falling back into the ocean with what you can only imagine will be a mighty splash.

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  • Saving the Seas of Sea Monsters

    Destination: Maui

    Pono the Lahaina Harbor dock dogWhen I arrived at slip number 17 at Lahaina Wharf to check in for my whale watching boat tour, it was mid-morning and clouds drizzled down the West Maui mountains behind me. It had rained hard overnight. But looking out to sea, the sky was blue. I hoped the skies would remain their blue color, but the bruised clouds behind me were making a convincing argument otherwise.

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  • A Lola-Palooza Whale of a Day

    Destination: Maui

    breaching whale off lahaina, mauiThe most often heard word on most whale watches is, “Blow.” And, indeed, that was the word I heard repeated again and again last night. As in, “Single blow. Three o’clock.” Or “Double blow. Ten o’clock.” Today, however, the word of the day started with a "B," but it wasn't "blow."

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  • Here fishy fishy fishy. Gone whale watching.

    Destination: Maui, Kauai

    Travel is hazardous to fingernails. I've only just sat down in seat 6B, and I've already ripped off two, one from each hand. But I don't mind. I've come to see my ragged fingernails as something else--a sign that I am once again doing that thing I love: traveling.

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  • A Whale of March Madness

    Destination: Maui

    view of humpback whale fluke off mauiI sat at Betty’s Beach Café on Maui overlooking the water in Lahaina. With one eye, I watched a pair of stand up paddlers wobble on stiff legs as they learned a new sport. A young girl in a pale blue bikini, white sunglasses and blonde hair pulled back into a pony tail got the hang of it. The guy didn’t. He opted to lie face down on his board and float. With the other eye, I practiced “stink eye.”

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  • Poi Dog Blog: A Cowboy, Vanilla Farmer, Photographer, Philosopher, Whale & Dolphin

    cute, little poi dog named luluAsk someone in Hawaii, “What kind of dog is that?” and they’re likely to say, “Oh, I don’t know. A poi dog.” Poi dog. Also known as “mixed breed.” Or, better yet, mutt. (I like how “mutt” doubles the “t” at the end of the word, a hint at the definition—a dog with an ancestry of more than one breed.) This column—Poi Dog Blog—as I’ve decided to call it, is simply a mash-up of articles I like from the Internet, all about Hawaii and written by a variety of authors. This edition shares stories on herding cattle, a Hawaii vanilla farm, whether Hawaii is "worth it," an amazing photographer and equally amazing tale of inter-species play between a whale and a dolphin.

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  • In Search of (Toothed) Whales off Kona

    Destination: Hawaii Island

    Underwater photo of Hawaiian spinner dolphin by Bo PardauA team of researchers is plying the waters off Kona on Hawaii (Big) Island right now. Led by Robin Baird of Cascadia Research Collective, they are in search of whales. No, not humpbacks. But odontocetes—toothed whales. The research project’s objectives are plenty.

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  • Summer Whalewatching in Hawaii: Part Four

    Destination: Kauai

    cascadia research boatFalse killer whales. They look nothing like the black-and-white killer whales so well known in the Pacific Northwest and occasionally spotted in Hawaii. False killer whales are dark grey and grow to approximately 12 to 18 feet. Their skull and teeth, however, are similar to Orcinus orca and gave rise to the scientific name Pseudorca crasidens.

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  • Summer Whalewatching: Part Three

    Destination: Kauai

    Underwater photo of Hawaiian spinner dolphin by Bo Pardau"One animal. Twelve o'clock. Fifty meters," Renee called out. She had briefed me earlier on my duties and stressed the three things that Robin--captaining our Wild Whale research vessel--was adamant about. He wanted to hear 1) animal species or, at the very least, its behavior, such as splash, blow, breach; 2) location on the clock, using the boat's bow as 12:00 and the stern as 6:00; and 3) distance from the boat in meters.

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