View From Here - Hawaii Travel Blog

Outrigger Hotels and Resorts > Trip Ideas > Hawaiian Islands > View From Here - Hawaii Travel Blog

Plan a trip

Check Availability  

Special rates require proof of eligibility at check-in.

You're one step closer to paradise...

View From Here - Hawaii Travel Blog - Volunteering on Vacation

Welcome to View from Here, a travel blog, where I write about living in, traveling about and experiencing Hawaii as a malihini, a 12-year-resident of the Hawaiian Islands. My name is Kim Steutermann Rogers, and you're likely to find blog posts here about food--who doesn't like to eat?--and outdoor adventure. Like hiking through Haleakala on Maui. Diving with manta rays off Hawaii (Big) Island. Snorkeling Shark's Cove on Oahu. And paddling Napali Coast of my home island, Kauai. Not that I'm some, young, adrenaline junkie. Those days are long over. I just enjoy collecting life experiences. And that's why you probably won't find much in the way of shopping here, unless it's about a fantastic, locally-made product--like soap--and the charming, young, single-mother who makes it. Then, I gush on and on. Oh, as a warning, I can sometimes jump on my soap box and write about the realities of marine debris, Hawaii's endangered species--like humpback whales and Hawaiian monk seals--great book discoveries and the wonders of nature. And my dogs.

Total Number of Entries - 23
123 > >|
  • From the Archives: Volunteering on Vacation

    Destination: Maui

    white hibiscus, native hawaii plant, close upMy husband and I are still on vacation, still celebrating our 25th wedding anniversary. But I am remembering the way we honored our 20th wedding anniversary on Maui--volunteering on vacation. So, I pulled this from the archives to share with you. I'll be back next week.

    Read More
  • Hana Needs a Home for the Holidays

    Destination: Kauai

    hana the dogI wasn’t sure about going to the beach with Hana. Not everyone likes the ocean with its moving water. Some prefer a calmer surface. That’s why I chose Kalapaki on Kauai’s southeast shore. Kalapaki is a white-sand beach practically smack in the middle of Lihue. It’s a quarter-mile long with an easy, wide beach tucked behind a protective finger of land, which was once owned by Princess Ruth Ke’elikolani.

    Read More
  • Hiking inside Haleakala Crater. Part Three.

    Destination: Maui

    kim at end of haleakala trekBy now, you know I made it down Haleakala on Maui. The question that remains is how. My comedian readers would say that I made it down the slopes of Haleakala one step at a time, and that I did. The descent out of Haleakala Crater from our cabin in Paliku to Kaupo descended a healthy 6,130 feet over 8.6 miles, and it appears that even trimming my toenails and buying hiking shoes one size too big wasn’t enough to prevent what athletes call turf toe.

    Read More
  • Hiking inside Haleakala Crater. Part two.

    Destination: Maui

    haleakala sunset at palikuSo, there I was, four o’clock in the afternoon on a rainy September Sunday, 10 miles by foot from the nearest paved road. Sitting in a wilderness cabin the size of my living room at 6,380-foot elevation inside the dormant volcano known as Haleakala on Maui. No cell service to call my mother and say we’d hadn’t died on the trek the day before. No wi-fi to check my email. No electricity to charge any electronics whatsoever.

    Read More
  • Hiking inside Haleakala Crater. Part One.

    Destination: Maui

    closeup of ahinahina leaves in haleakalaHaleakala is famous for its sunrises. Visitors head up the mountain in the black of night in order to witness the sun crawl up and over the tallest mountain on Maui, a dormant volcano, a sight considered by some to be an otherworldly experience. At 10,023-foot elevation, the black of night also delivers a spectacular star show, an added bonus, not quite as famous as its Mauna Kea neighbor, also peaking above the clouds, on Hawaii (Big) Island. But spectacular all the same.

    Read More
  • A Weekend on Napali: Part Five

    Destination: Kauai

    alapii point from nualolo kaiI walked to the nearby picnic area and introduced myself to a man with an easy smile and a beautiful weathered face as radiant and warm as any of the sunsets we had witnessed over the past four nights along Nāpali Coast. “Sit. Sit,” he said to me and patted the bench next to him. He had spent the night here, in the open air, making the table his bed. I sat, and he buttered a Saloon Pilot cracker, careful to spread the butter evenly. He offered the buttered cracker to me, “Like?” A portable radio played Hawaiian music. Steam rose from his instant coffee in the plastic cap of an old thermos.

    Read More
  • A Weekend on Napali: Part Four

    Destination: Kauai

    sunset from nualolo kaiMike & Natalia caught a late afternoon boat ride back to Kīkīaola and civilization with Captain Andy’s Raft Expeditions, one of three boat tour operators permitted to land at Nu‘alolo Kai and take their passengers on a guided tour through the valley, and that left me with time on my hands to do some real work.

    Read More
  • A Weekend on Napali: Part Three

    Destination: Kauai

    rare hedyotis plant on kauaiThe camp kitchen had been set up. My tent was barely pitched and not a grain of sand had yet found its way into my sleeping bag when the two botanists geared up, both in long sleeved shirts, long pants and hats, and both toting bulging backpacks. Both, too, wearing studded tabi boots, a kind of Japanese fishing sock meets golf shoe that, apparently, is footwear de rigueur for botanists. I would soon learn why.

    Read More
  • A Weekend on Napali: Part Two

    Destination: Kauai

    nualolo kai cliff wall with xYesterday, I wrote about my arrival at Nu‘alolo Kai along Kaua‘i’s Nāpali Coast State Park. Today, I share some of the earliest written accounts of Nāpali and Nu‘alolo--all by non-Hawaiians. Hiram Bingham and his entourage first arrived in Hawaii in 1820, on behalf of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. In 1821, he voyaged along Nāpali Coast in a double-hulled canoe. Here is a snippet of his arrival at Nu‘alolo Kai.

    Read More
  • A Weekend on Napali: Part One

    Destination: Kauai

    nualolo valley wide shot of reefThe sky was dark when we met at Kīkīaola Harbor on Kaua‘i’s west side, a pile of yellow, blue, green and red dry bags gathering on the dock as each member of our work party arrived at the rude hour of 5:00 a.m. We said our groggy hellos, sharing breath in the traditional Hawaiian greeting known as honi and with the more common pecks on the cheek. A sky full of diamonds sparkled overhead.

    Read More
123 > >|

Subscribe To Our Blog

Subscribe to "View from Here," our Hawaii blog. And receive an email whenever a new post publishes.

Weather

Older Posts

< Previous
More >
Toll-Free (US, Canada & Guam): +1-866-956-4262 - Worldwide Phone: +1-303-369-7777 - Copyright: © 2010-2014 Outrigger Hotels Hawaii