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View From Here - Outrigger Travel Blog - Sightseeing & Shopping

Total Number of Entries - 62
  • Welcome to Maui. Welcome to Whale Soup.

    Destination: Maui

    Hawaiian humpback whale breaching off Maui We boarded a Trilogy's Elua catamaran on the sandy shores of Kaanapali, Maui at 4:00 on a hot February afternoon, as a Kona system from the south evaporated Hawaii's cooling trade winds and vog from Hawaii (Big) Island's Kilauea volcano settled on the islands of Lanai and Molokai to our west.  February is known for pretty much one thing in Maui: Whales. Just three days before a whole day was dedicated to the celebration of whales in Kihei, complete with a Parade of Whales, Run for the Whales, Hawaiian music concert, “Made on Maui” market, food--lots and lots of food—and more.

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  • Kohala Coast Getaway, Part 4: Mauna Kea

    Destination: Hawaii Island

    view of moon through mauna kea teleascope on big islandWe met Hawaii Forest and Trail at the King’s Shops in Waikoloa for a journey to the top of Mauna Kea and some stargazing. According to Jon, our guide, the night’s plan would have us traverse Waikoloa Road—with a stop at Waikoloa Village to pick up dinner and, “most importantly, cookies”—and continue to Highway 190. We’d take a left, passing through a one-time native forest and now pasturelands, and then a right on Hawaii (Big) Island’s infamous Saddle Road. We’d climb half way up the mountain, stop, eat, acclimatize, don jackets—really warm jackets—and head for the summit, where the temperature was predicted to be “about freezing,” a full 50 degrees colder than when we’d started out at sea level.

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  • Kohala Coast Getaway, Part 2: King's Trail

    Destination: Hawaii Island

    The King’s Trail, also called the Mamalahoa Trail, once ran for 32 coastal miles from the village of Kailua-Kona in the south to the village of Puako in the north. The sign along Waikoloa Beach Road says it was originally built in the mid 1800s by prisoners and Hawaiians who paid their taxes in labor. It was used as a highway, of sorts, for pack animals. As such, it was stretched taut, in a straight line, with curbs of stone built up along the sides in order to keep the horses, donkeys and mules on the right path, just in case their riders nodded off to sleep during their long ride. I would imagine many of these riders set out at night to avoid the heat of the day, because there is absolutely no shade on the trail.

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  • Bagging Litter

    Destination: Oahu

    muumuu heaven dresses on a rackAs I walked down the sidewalk, I passed a slip of paper on the ground. I looked at it long enough to note that it was the stub of a used boarding pass. In the early morning fog that is my brain, I remembered writing once about how important it is to stop to pick up slips of paper like this one. How the act, even for a scrap, completed over and over again, turns into a habit and a way of thinking about taking care of our environment as if it is our living room. And how the act of picking up litter—especially someone’s else—witnessed by others, serves, possibly, as a pay-it-forward, chain reaction.

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  • Monks at Starbucks and New Year's Resolutions

    Destination: Kauai

    kauai hindu temple long shotFor many, time seems to operate differently in Hawaii.  What they mean is that time moves more slowly here in these islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean—far removed from the goings on of the epicenter of American financial life in New York City, political life in Washington D.C. and the entertainment nexus of Los Angeles.  They mean that things take longer in Hawaii.  That people don’t race through their days.  That people don’t watch the clock.  That it’s perfectly acceptable—the practice, daresay—to arrive five to 10 minutes late for dinner, a get-together, at a friend’s house.

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