Snorkeling & Water Adventures

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Snorkeling & Water Adventures

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Total Number of Articles - 53
  • Humpback Whale Guide

    Here you'll find tips on whale watching in Hawaii, the best points and peaks around the Hawaiians Islands to watch whales from land, things to think about before selecting a boat outfitter to get up close and personal with those behemoth 45-foot, 45 ton marine mammals. You'll also find a couple videos, an interview with a whale researcher and numerous blog articles and feature stories we've written about Hawaii's whales. We've also included a hand reference to those Outrigger properties with "whale-view rooms," so you can watch humpback whales breach, spy hop, pec slap, peduncle throw and fluke up dive from the comfort of your own lanai. Read More
  • Things You Can Do to Protect Coral Reefs

    Our world's coral reefs are precious and fragile. You may not live near one, but your health may rely on its health. There are many things you can do to help preserve our coral reefs, in Hawaii and beyond. This list is from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Coral Reef Conservation Program.

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  • How to Select a Whale Watching Boat Tour

    Whalewatching Waikoloa catamaran, Big IslandThere are dozens of boat companies from which to choose. They all offer “whale watching tours.” Many claim they are the best. Others guarantee you’ll see a whale. It can get a tad overwhelming. How is a person to decide? Here, we provide a few questions to ask—the boat operator and yourself—in order to make sure you experience a pleasurable whale watching outing. Read More
  • What? There's Another Whale Besides the Humpback?

    false killer whale head lungeAt the marina, six biologists popped out of their van, hauling a dozen waterproof Pelican cases of all sizes and colors. They stashed their gear on a 27-foot Boston Whaler with military precision. Within a few minutes, we pushed off and motored out of the harbor. I took my spot on the fly bridge, the extended prow of the boat--think hood ornament of a car. My job as a volunteer on board would be to look for blows, breaches, lunges, dorsal fins, logging or any other whale behavior at the surface of the ocean. Read More
  • Hawaii's Whaling History

    mark twain's letters from hawaii bookIn 1866, Samuel Clemens visited Hawaii—or the Sandwich Islands, as he still liked to call the archipelago. He was a young man, new to the pseudonym Mark Twain, notable for wearing a brown, linen duster in his travels “ransacking” the islands. His hair was red then, always whipped into a frenzy by the trade winds, but he already sported that wooly mustache of his. Two of Twain’s 25 letters originally published by the Sacramento Union and included in the anthology Mark Twain’s Letters from Hawaii, edited by A. Grove Day, tackle whaling. Before the big business of sugar took over, whaling provided a good economy to the Hawaiian Islands.

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  • Whale Watching Tips

    Hawaiian humpback whale breaching off MauiHumpback whales spend plenty of their time in Hawaii near-shore. That makes it easy to spot them. Here are a few tips on what to pack and what to look for and where to go to witness these behemoths in action.

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  • There's Plastic In My Fish Sandwich!

    Plastic bottles that once contained water, bleach, motor oil and other liquids. Plastic lobster and crab traps. Mounds of nylon fishing nets. I am not surprised when I find this kind of trash on the beach. What I don’t understand, though, are the televisions, car wheels and the toilet seat lids that I have discovered on more than one beach walk.

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  • Friendly Snorkeling Tips

    Coral reefs are among the world’s most spectacular habitats and snorkeling is an excellent way to explore them. Follow these simple guidelines to help protect the coral reefs you visit.

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  • Hawaiiloa Returns to the Sea

    hawaiiloa back on the waterThe Sand Island boatyard was hot and dusty this past Monday, the day, once and for all, Hawai`iloa made it into the water. There’s an old saying that goes, “Many hands make light work.” And while it may be true, there always seem to be one or two individuals whose hands appear more often, do more work. Such was the case with the restoration of Hawai`iloa. Read More
  • Kids Ask the Best Hokulea Questions

    life ring on hokulea canoeIt was dusk, after school, when a couple dozen students from Punahou School gathered at Sand Island on Oahu to tour the famous voyaging canoe Hokulea. For all her reputation and cultural significance, the canoe isn’t very big. That was especially apparent this night, one of the last school visits that wrapped up the Malama Hawaii leg of Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Worldwide Voyage. For nearly the past year, Hokulea has sailed 1,000 miles within the archipelago of Hawaii and welcomed thousands of students—and parents and teachers and curious others like myself—on board. On the evening of my visit, Ka`iulani Murphy—with whom I chatted on Waikiki Beach—fielded questions from students. And, since I found the kids’ questions fascinating and insightful, I’m going to share them—and Ka`iiulani’s answers—here. Read More
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