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Arts & Local Culture

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Total Number of Articles - 81
  • Sustainable. Locavore. Green. Hawaiian.

    Ono Organic Farms dragon fruit on MauiSustainability. Green. Conservation. Environmental. Locavore. Whatever trendy term you call it, the movement to preserve our world isn't new. Living on islands now known to be the most remote body of land on the globe, Hawaiians were renowned for their conservation...environmental...sustainable...green...practices. Let's put it this way, whatever term you choose, those old time Hawaiians knew how to take care of their environment as if it was their living room. Or refrigerator. Or bathtub. Because, often, it was. Here are some stories about Hawaii's sustainability movement and how you can help. Read More
  • The Meditative Quality of Hawaii's Traditional Textile Craft

    close up of kapa maker handsIt’s mid-afternoon, the sun is pounding, and Sabra Kauka and I take cover under the shade of a robust noni tree, native to Polynesia, also known as the Indian mulberry, a tree that produces a fruit renowned for its medicinal properties--and smell. Some liken the aroma to blue cheese. Read More
  • The Languages in My Heart

    author photo of constance Connie Hale likes to say she grew up bi-lingual--in English. She spoke "proper" English at home around the dinner table, but could let unfurl with a string of Pidgin around the schoolyard and beaches and cane fields and cattle ranches of Oahu's North Shore. In this article, Connie shares her love affair with the many sounds and languages you'll find spoken in Hawaii. 

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  • Get to Know Hula. Get to Know Hawaii.

    hula dancer hands tell the storyHula is a uniquely Hawaiian dance performed with oli (chant) and mele (song) to convey the many stories and traditions of the Hawaiian people. These stories might be light-heared. They might be sensual. They may evoke a spiritual or worshipful essence. They may be told at breakneck speed or a hypnotic pace. Read More
  • Hawaiiloa Sails Again

    Jerry Ongies likes to get things just right. “How tall is this?” he asks as he unclips the handy tape  measure attached to the waistband of his jeans. “About 18 inches?” He uncoils a length and stretches it across a box at his feet. It measures exactly 17 inches. “That’s too low,” he says. “Imagine you’ve got your stove in here, and you’re cooking. The whole thing is way too low.” Read More
  • Hawaiiloa Returns to the Sea

    hawaiiloa back on the waterThe Sand Island boatyard was hot and dusty this past Monday, the day, once and for all, Hawai`iloa made it into the water. There’s an old saying that goes, “Many hands make light work.” And while it may be true, there always seem to be one or two individuals whose hands appear more often, do more work. Such was the case with the restoration of Hawai`iloa. Read More
  • Kids Ask the Best Hokulea Questions

    life ring on hokulea canoeIt was dusk, after school, when a couple dozen students from Punahou School gathered at Sand Island on Oahu to tour the famous voyaging canoe Hokulea. For all her reputation and cultural significance, the canoe isn’t very big. That was especially apparent this night, one of the last school visits that wrapped up the Malama Hawaii leg of Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Worldwide Voyage. For nearly the past year, Hokulea has sailed 1,000 miles within the archipelago of Hawaii and welcomed thousands of students—and parents and teachers and curious others like myself—on board. On the evening of my visit, Ka`iulani Murphy—with whom I chatted on Waikiki Beach—fielded questions from students. And, since I found the kids’ questions fascinating and insightful, I’m going to share them—and Ka`iiulani’s answers—here. Read More
  • Waikiki Beach Walk-and-Talk: Navigating with Ka`iulani Murphy

    pvs navigator kaiulani murphy walks waikiki beachThe sun was setting behind a bank of clouds off Waikiki when I met Ka`iulani Murphy on the beach fronting Outrigger Reef on the Beach. Conditions weren’t perfect for a green flash. They weren’t even great for picture-taking, but the nightly sunset-watching crowd had emerged just the same. This was back in January. The night before, a thunderstorm had excited the sky with threads of lightning and this evening, strong winds poured on-shore. Read More
  • The Detonation of Plumeria

    For many of our Facebook followers, I’ve recently learned, the quintessential scent that represents Hawaii is plumeria. There. Did that single word send you tumbling into a memory of Hawaii?

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  • Pixel Postcard: Backside of Diamond Head

    view of diamond head from backside

    This week in Hawaii, those of us on the windward sides of the islands are drying out after a series of wet weather patterns that sprouted waterfalls and mud puddles here and there around the island chain. There was actually blue sky covering my corner of paradise today, and for that, I am thankful. Last week, I found myself on a boat off Waikiki on another such sunny day. (One of the great things about Waikiki is its location on the leeward side of the island pretty much guarantees sun almost every day of the year. If it does rain in Waikiki, the sun often shines right through the raindrops.)

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